Danielle Klindt

Age: 29

Education: Bellevue College, Associate in Arts and Sciences, 2017

SU Major: Nursing, 2019

Service:

  • Member, Rock and Walk Fundraiser, The Tears Foundation, 2008-Present

Awards/Honors:

  • Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, 2015-2017
  • Graduation with High Distinction, Bellevue College, 2017
  • Messina Scholar, Seattle University, 2017-2018
  • Alfie Scholar, Seattle University

Goals: Through Seattle University’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing program, I hope to become a competent and steadfast leader in holistic care within the nursing field. I plan to further my education by pursuing a Doctor of Nursing Practice degree and becoming a nurse practitioner, and eventually I hope to teach future nurses at the university level.

Civility: Civility, to me, is loving others without knowing them personally. It’s respecting their perspective without agreeing with it. Civility is treating others with kindness when they don’t necessarily “deserve” it; because we all deserve it. Civility is understanding that other people’s life experiences have shaped them in ways that are different than our own and that those differences are opportunities to learn and teach rather than have conflict with one another.

Civility is being mindful that our actions and words affect others in ways that we sometimes can’t imagine, so we should use them wisely. Civility is both speaking up and remaining silent for others. In its simplest form, civility is being a good human to other beings and looking past our preconceived notions of truth to build bridges and better the quality of life for all.

Civility is incredibly important in our era. I feel that civil discourse and de-escalation strategies are the only way to change the biases and plain old hatred that are currently picking apart our country and others around the globe. Civility can’t happen without the deeply felt need to understand, and it is my belief that those of us who feel this need have to take the first step to creating a more civil world by speaking up and having really honest and open discussions.

I would say that a great example of the power of civility is my own personal story. I have a colorful background with a lot of anger and destructive cycles embedded in my roots, and yet I am kind and have an undeniably positive outlook on life because of the empathy I’ve received from others. We should all be fully aware that genuine concern and care for others is likely to have a ripple effect in their life and the lives of those around them. And genuine love and compassion for our children is incredibly likely to change the future of the world.

Autobiography: I was raised in Portland, Oregon. I am a first-generation college student and a mother to two small children. Like many, I was an angry teenager and young adult who traveled through life with little regard for others or their feelings. I was on a destructive path, but change came for me through tragedy when my first child was stillborn. Through the kindness and compassion of strangers, my postpartum nurses, I realized two important things: that I had to change my life and attitude towards others, and that I wanted to become a nurse myself because I wanted to change lives in the way that those women changed mine. Because of that experience, I believe that it is incredibly important to care for others as whole humans: mind, body, and spirit. And because of that experience, I feel so strongly that the smallest act of kindness can change a person’s entire outlook on life.

After completing the program to become a Certified Nursing Assistant from the American Healthcare CNA School, I went on to earn my Associates in Arts and Sciences degree at Bellevue College. My short-term goal is to earn a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing and then continue my education at the graduate level.

My personal life experiences have shown me that tragedy breeds resilience and that each hardship we face creates a learning opportunity that pushes us to grow as individuals. Because of my past I am extremely adaptable to change, tend to thrive when the pressure is on, and have never been one to shy away from a difficult task. I also possess a deep-seated desire to facilitate growth, both in my community and within myself.