Kaddy Suso: Get Educated or Die Trying

Kaddy Suso: Get Educated or Die Trying

“I would die for my education,” says Alfie Scholar Kaddy Suso, age 26. Getting an education has been Kaddy’s raison d’etre since she was a young girl in a small village in The Gambia. This was not the plan her family had in mind. As traditionalists, they expected her, like most women in her country, to marry in her early teens, become a gardener, and bear children. That never appealed to Kaddy, who found joy in learning from the get-go and who recognized the unfairness of only allowing men to get an education and the upper hand in society.

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Angela Flores-Marcus: Planting the STEMs for Future Women in Tech

Angela Flores-Marcus: Planting the STEMs for Future Women in Tech

When you read about Angela Flores-Marcus’s accomplishments, you are immediately awestruck. Her dedication to her community is apparent through the numerous organizations she has engaged in, including serving as the Vice President of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the President of Women in STEM club, and Co-Chair of the Queer-Straight Alliance. Her academic excellence is demonstrated by the eleven scholarships she has been awarded and the honor societies she is a part of.

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Alfie Scholars 2018 Cohort on the Philosophy of the Civil Person

To cultivate leaders for civility in their chosen professions and communities, we encourage Alfies to embrace their authentic selves and life’s purpose. We support them in doing so by providing the tools to develop and strengthen their own voice. They learn the importance of hearing their own voice, not only for themselves but for their communities and our society at large. The Alfies learn to communicate their ideas, perspectives, emotions, and values that shape their voice.

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Julia Mariga

Julia Mariga

When Alfie Scholar and Seattle University College of Nursing graduate, Julia Mariga, found out she was selected by her cohort of 75-80 fellow nursing students to speak at the Pinning Ceremony, she was “genuinely shocked.” She expected someone more “vocal” to be elected and saw herself as a “fly-on-the-wall” in her classes, gently guiding her peers towards various resources and support. “It feels good to know I’ve been helpful to people even when I thought I was just doing a kind thing. It’s good to see people actually benefited from my help,” she says humbly.

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